Reflections on The Syrian Conflict: From Quiet Revolution to Refugee Crisis and Resettlement

Listen to the Soundcloud interview HERE

The present refugee crises in Syria has triggered the world’s largest humanitarian crisis since World War II. Vast human rights atrocities continue to occur from within both Syria and a myriad of nations’ borders often struggling to accommodate the influx of refugees searching for peace and stability. In recent years then, the images of the refugees crossing vast bodies of water have become a symbol of the Syrian conflict. What began as a quiet revolution has erupted into a civil war resulting in the present refugee crises we”re witnessing today.
In this regard, we fail to acknowledge and understand the underlying roots of the conflict and the complexities associated with refugee resettlement and integration.

This podcast consists of a diverse selection of narratives that seek to address different dimensions of the conflict while particularly underlining the historical continuum, and the descriptions and implications of what the refugee resettlement and integration looks from the local process in cities across Canada and in Europe, the role of security/policy advisers and the different ways individuals such as students are getting involved .

Interview #1 [01:40-14:25]
Afra Jalabi, Vice-Chair of the executive body of “The Day After Project”; journalist and Syrian peace advocate
(Interviewed by Soyoung Lee)

Interview #2 [14:40-24:30]
Phoebe Colby and Anton Zyngier: representatives from student led initiative to tutor Syrian refugees
(Interviewed by Imogen Malpas)

Interview #3 [24:30-30:05]
Dr. Erin Marie Saltman
Senior Counter-Extremism Researcher at the Institute of Strategic Dialogue based in London.
(Interviewed by Imogen Malpas)

Interview #4 [30:07-42:40]
Sabine Lehr, Immigrant Settlement Services Manager at the Intercultural Association of Greater Victoria
(Interviewed by Amisha Parikh-Friese)

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