Archive

Double-Edged Sword: The EndSARS Protests and Nigeria’s LGBTQ+ Citizens

Double-Edged Sword: The EndSARS Protests and Nigeria’s LGBTQ+ Citizens

The EndSARS movement against police brutality in Nigeria has captured global media attention in recent weeks. While it has been hailed as a moment of tremendous progress, one must also consider whether this progress leaves any citizens behind. Nigeria is regarded as one of the most anti-gay societies on earth. Within the nation, same-sex sexual […]

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Unlawful and Inhumane: The Recent Attacks on Mi’kmaq Fishing Pounds and the Canadian Government’s Ambivalence

Unlawful and Inhumane: The Recent Attacks on Mi’kmaq Fishing Pounds and the Canadian Government’s Ambivalence

“It has always been the greatest honour of my life to represent the people of my community, however, today perhaps more than ever, as we have seen their resilience and strength emerge on the world’s stage in recent weeks,” the Sipekne’katik Chief Mike Sack told a news release upon his reelection as chief of the […]

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War Profiteering in Canadian Politics: How are Canadians Complicit?

War Profiteering in Canadian Politics: How are Canadians Complicit?

In recent decades, Canadians have felt increasingly detached from the misery of war, and consequently, take their human security for granted. As they turn on the news and educate themselves on war-zone conflict, they question the morality of callous governments and war criminals. While such outrage is necessary, it is time that Canadians stop deflecting […]

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History Repeats Itself: Pandemics’ Disproportionate Impact on LMICs

History Repeats Itself: Pandemics’ Disproportionate Impact on LMICs

At the June 2020 General Assembly, United Nations (UN) Secretary General Antonio Guterres declared that the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic are falling “disproportionately on the most vulnerable: people living in poverty, the working poor, women and children, persons with disabilities, and other marginalized groups.” His statement accurately depicts the asymmetric effect that this pandemic […]

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Why do Northern Canadians pay $14 for ketchup? Food insecurity in the territories

Why do Northern Canadians pay $14 for ketchup? Food insecurity in the territories

Food insecurity seldom comes to mind when considering Canada, a country recognized for its high standard of living. For those in the provinces, it may be shocking to hear the prices that those living in Northern Canada have to pay for such basic necessities. Yet food prices are so exorbitant that Northern Canadians, in particular the Indigenous communities that make up the majority of the population, are unable to sustain their families’ nutritional requirements. Government efforts to combat the issue are continuously insufficient and ineffective, exacerbating the structural inequalities faced by Indigenous populations in Canada.

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Zoom for Disadvantaged Zoomers: A Possible Expansion of Technology and Education Within the Developing World

Zoom for Disadvantaged Zoomers: A Possible Expansion of Technology and Education Within the Developing World

The intersection of technology and education may not have been equitably galvanized, but the implementation of the platforms behind this intersection has been explored to the point where applications show promise in affecting change within the developing world; a high-quality education can help in fostering change in societies that suffer from marginalization. Through policymaking derived from the principle of egalitarian rational discourse, which is defined as a system of non-partisan individual and institutional political and social criticism of ineffectual structures for the good of all people, utilizing online education platforms at all levels, and responsible policymaking on the part of international bodies such as the UN and blocs such as Western Europe, both acting in concert with the developing world, the world stands to obtain long-term gains in its social and economic welfare.

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Poverty Continues to Force Girls out of School

Poverty Continues to Force Girls out of School

Education is crucial to ensure human dignity of individuals. The right to education, as stipulated by UNESCO, entails primary education that is free, compulsory, and universal, and secondary education that is generally available, accessible to all, and progressively free. Yet, according to UNESCO estimates, 130 million girls ages 6 to 17 are out of school, and 15 million girls of primary-school age will never gain access to a classroom in their lives. Despite education being one of the most powerful tools in elevating the quality of life for marginalized individuals, it is often those very individuals that are subjected to conditions that restrain them from receiving this education. One of the most prominent global barriers to education for children is poverty. While poverty suppresses both male and female education, young girls experience distinct barriers that necessitate specific analysis, as exemplified in my case study of Nigeria.

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Podcast Series: “This is Bill 21”

Podcast Series: “This is Bill 21”

This four-part podcast series focuses on the controversial Bill 21, a bill passed in June 2019 banning public workers in positions of “authority” from wearing religious symbols while on duty. JHR McGill interviews guests Robert Leckey (Dean of McGill Faculty of Law), Genevieve Mercier Dalphond (Activist and PhD student) and Daniel Béland (McGill Political Science […]

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Garment Industry: Modern Day Slavery?

Garment Industry: Modern Day Slavery?

Prior to the nineteenth century, textile and clothing production relied primarily on made-by-hand methods. The Industrial Revolution of the early nineteenth century marked the transition to a new, more efficient manufacturing process in the Western world. Mechanized methods of manufacturing became widespread, resulting in cheaper and faster clothing production. As consumer prices fell, new apparel retailers emerged to cater to a growing demand for affordable garments, and to create employment opportunities. While the Industrial Revolution provided an incentive to increase profits, these motivations were also responsible for creating deplorable working conditions that exploited the absence of labor protection laws.

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The Greatest Threat to the Human Right to Health: Climate Change

The Greatest Threat to the Human Right to Health: Climate Change

“The enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, political belief, economic or social condition,” according to the World Health Organization. Health as a human right, however, has been widely overlooked as it becomes increasingly threatened by the effects of climate change. The health effects are not only diverse but also overwhelmingly negative and wide-ranging. These effects being both direct and indirect will therefore impact all individuals as well as economies worldwide. Populations are pressured to change their diets, rapid changes to ice, snow, and land result in more life-threatening accidents, and natural sources of drinking water are disappearing and diminishing in quality. It is estimated that between 2030 and 2050, there will be 250,000 additional annual deaths resulting from heat exposure, malaria, diarrhoea, and childhood malnutrition. The protection of the environment has thus become a crucial part of the contemporary human rights doctrine. According to the Office of the High Commissions for Human Rights, “Human rights law requires each State to do more than merely refrain from interfering with human rights itself; it also requires the State to undertake due diligence to protect against such harm from other sources.” The State has a duty to its people to safeguard their well being even if it means regulating environmentally harmful corporations and industries. Therefore, it is the evident inaction by global institutions, such as governments, relating to the exacerbation of climate change that violates the fundamental human right to health.

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